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Next: Conclusion Up: Lomask et al.: Flattening Previous: Methodology

Field data example

We tested this method on the Chevron Shoal data shown in Figure [*]. At first glance, the 2D in-line section does not appear to have much faulting. However, there is actually a nearly vertical fault near the center, and dip estimators will return incorrect estimates at faults.

 
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Figure 3
Faulted Chevron Gulf of Mexico data. Although it is difficult to see, the 2D vertical section shows fault with significant displacement, enough to cause our dip estimator to return erroneous values.
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Figure 4
The result of flattening of Figure [*]
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We applied our IRLS flattening method to this data to get the result shown in Figure [*]. The position of the fault is more obvious in this image because the data on either side were shifted by the flattening process.

The fault weight automatically created by this method is shown in Figure [*]. It is, however, more insightful to overlay the fault weight on the original unflattened data as in Figure [*]. Also, it is interesting to note that the fault appears to be segmented.

 
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Figure 5
The fault weight automatically created by flattening Figure [*]
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Figure 6
The input data with the
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next up previous print clean
Next: Conclusion Up: Lomask et al.: Flattening Previous: Methodology
Stanford Exploration Project
5/3/2005